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Enter the characters you see below Sorry, we just need to make sure you’re not a robot. The Northrop F-5A and F-5B Freedom Fighter and the F-5E and F-5F Tiger II are part of a supersonic light fighter family, initially designed in the late 1950s by Northrop Corporation. After winning the International Fighter Aircraft competition in 1970, a program aimed at providing effective low-cost fighters to American allies, Northrop introduced the second-generation F-5E Tiger II in 1972. This upgrade included more powerful engines, higher fuel capacity, greater wing area and improved leading edge extensions for a better turn rate, optional air-to-air refueling, and improved avionics including air-to-air radar. The F-5 was also developed into a dedicated reconnaissance version, the RF-5 Tigereye. Another highly influential figure was chief engineer Welko Gasich, who convinced Schmued that the engines must be located within the fuselage for maximum performance. Gasich also for the first time introduced the concept of “life cycle cost” into fighter design, which provided the foundation for the F-5’s low operating cost and long service life. The F-5 earned a reputation for a jet that was hard to discern in the air and when one finally saw it, it was often after a missile or guns kill had already been called.

Singapore’s former Chief of Air Force and F-5 pilot, Major General Ng Chee Khern. The F-5 development effort was formally started in the mid-1950s by Northrop Corporation for a low-cost, low-maintenance fighter. The company designation for the first design as the N-156, intended partly to meet a U. Navy requirement for a jet fighter to operate from its escort carriers, which were too small to operate the Navy’s existing jet fighters. The N-156T was quickly selected by the United States Air Force as a replacement for the T-33 in July 1956. On 12 June 1959, the first prototype aircraft, which was subsequently designated as YT-38 Talon, performed its first flight. Although testing of the N-156F was successful, demonstrating unprecedented reliability and proving superior in the ground-attack role to the USAF’s existing North American F-100 Super Sabres, official interest in the Northrop type waned, and by 1960 it looked as if the program was a failure. In 1962, however, the Kennedy Administration revived the requirement for a low-cost export fighter, selecting the N-156F as winner of the F-X competition on 23 April 1962 subsequently becoming the “F-5A”, being ordered into production in October that year. F-5A, with better air-to-air performance against aircraft like the Soviet MiG-21.

The resultant aircraft, initially known as F-5A-21, subsequently became the F-5E. The first F-5E flew on 11 August 1972. A two-seat combat-capable trainer, the F-5F, was offered, first flying on 25 September 1974, at Edwards Air Force Base, with a new nose, that was 3 feet longer, which, unlike the F-5B that did not mount a gun, allowed it to retain a single M39 cannon, albeit with a reduced ammunition capacity. A reconnaissance version, the RF-5E Tigereye, with a sensor package in the nose displacing the radar and one cannon, was also offered. 792 F-5Es, 146 F-5Fs and 12 RF-5Es were eventually built by Northrop. The F-5E proved to be a successful combat aircraft for U. F-5A with modifications referred to as F-5C was flown by the U.

The F-5E evolved into the single-engine F-5G, which was rebranded the F-20 Tigershark. Various F-5 versions remain in service with many nations. One NASA F-5E was given a modified fuselage shape for its employment in the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration program carried out by DARPA. F-5s undergo an extensive upgrade program, resulting in the aircraft re-designated as F-5T Tigris. Similar programs have been carried out in Chile and Brazil with the help of Elbit. The Brazilian program, re-designated as F-5M, adds a new Grifo-F radar along with several avionics and cockpit refurbishments, including the Dash helmet. The first contract for the production F-5A was issued in 1962, the first overseas order coming from the Royal Norwegian Air Force on 28 February 1964. It entered service with the 4441st Combat Crew Training School of the USAF, which had the role of training pilots and ground crew for customer nations, on 30 April that year. This changed with testing and limited deployment in 1965.

In June 1967, the 10th FCS’s surviving aircraft were supplied to the air force of South Vietnam, which previously had only Cessna A-37 Dragonfly and Douglas A-1 Skyraider attack aircraft. In realistic trials at Nellis AFB in 1977, the F-14 reportedly scored slightly better than a 2:1 kill ratio against the simpler F-5, while the F-15 scored slightly less. A former Swiss F-5N in service with U. The F-5E served with the U. Fs purchased from Switzerland in 2006. Fs with modernized avionics and other improved systems. According to the FAA, there are 18 privately owned F-5s in the U. The first three aircraft arrived on 12 March 1975. In 1988, FAB acquired 22 F-5E and four F-5F second-hand USAF “aggressor” fighters. F aircraft, re-designated as F-5EM and F-5FM.